June 02, 2022 11 min read

How Coffee Grinders Affect the Cup of Joe

Coffee grinding is a physically violent activity. In a bean hopper, which is not a terrible place in and of itself, the coffee is removed from its pleasant and friendly home in a bag or container and placed into a grinder. It is only after that that the grinder is switched on that you can hear the sound of the motor and the burrs rotating madly as the coffee begins to be crushed into minute bits. Your coffee experience begins here, in this hub of activity.

Heat

The ultimate outcome of your espresso or coffee will be determined by how uniformly your coffee is ground and what temperature it reaches once it has been ground. You are correct in that when the coffee is ground, it will absorb heat, and the more heat your coffee absorbs, the more negatively it will effect your end product in terms of flavor. If you are just grinding enough coffee for a double shot, no matter which grinder you use, the coffee will not get much heat. The more coffee you ground, the hotter the coffee becomes as a result of the increased heat generated by the grinding burrs and surrounding elements.

Static

In addition, the feared static charge that may cause the ground coffee to virtually leap out of the ground coffee container is a probable by-product of the grinding process. It is something that must be seen to be believed. Is it ever the case that your hair stands on end after putting on a heavy wool sweater? A static charge has taken the place of a ghost in this case.

An electrostatic charge is created when the coffee is ground, then driven via a chute and into an appropriate container. This ghostly phenomena is influenced by a number of factors, including the speed at which the grinding burrs rotate, the manner the coffee leaves the chute, humidity, temperature, and the kind of coffee used. It is difficult to manage the majority of these variables, but it is simple to control whatever grinder you choose to buy. High-speed grinders, on the other hand, are known for producing the greatest amount of static charge and heating up your freshly ground coffee. Check out our blog post to find out more about the differences between high-speed and low-speed grinders.

The Grind Size is the size of the coffee granules

What we're talking about here is the fineness or coarseness with which your coffee is ground. The size of the grind you will need is closely tied to the sort of equipment you will be using to brew your coffee, the freshness of the coffee, and the way the coffee is roasted. Different varieties of espresso/coffee machines are intended to extract taste and fragrance from the coffee in a variety of ways, each with its own set of characteristics. As a result, they need a different size grind. In the following section, you will find suggestions to assist you in determining what you will want in order to get the most out of your espresso/coffee machine.

  • The French Press is quite coarse.
  • Coarse is the pour over.
  • Drip coffee is coarse to medium in texture.
  • Siphon: No problem.
  • Espresso machines produce a fine powder that is nearly powder-like in texture. Coffee that has been dried out must be ground finer than freshly roasted coffee.
  • Turkish Coffee is really good. It has to be crushed down to a fine powder.

Grinders with burrs vs blades

What is a Blade Grinder, and how does it work?

Blade grinders do not grind consistently enough to produce high-quality coffee beverages. They feature a blade that looks similar to that of a propeller, and it slices the coffee beans into little pieces. The fineness of the grind is decided by the length of time you allow the grinder to work, which is controlled by a built-in timer. The longer the coffee is ground, the finer the grind gets.

The disadvantages of using a blade grinder are that the grind may range from powder to chunks and that the coffee builds up a static charge, which causes it to adhere to just about everything and making it quite messy. In light of these considerations, we do not advocate using a blade grinder.

What is a Burr Grinder and how does it work?

In a coffee grinder, the burrs are the portion that smashes the coffee beans into a consistent size, which is necessary for making a great espresso or coffee. The burrs are also known as the cutting blades. There are two types of burr grinders available: conical and flat plate.

Burr Grinders with ridges are cone-shaped burrs that grind or smash coffee beans. Flat Plate Burr Grinders contain two similar and parallel rings that are serrated on the side that faces the other. They are also known as parallel rings burr grinders. Both burr grinders contain one burr that remains fixed while the motor rotates the second burr. The beans are dragged in between the two burrs and crushed into a consistent size as they pass through. Both kinds of grinders are renowned for their versatility and high level of performance. One cannot go wrong with any of these options.

Both types of burrs are utilized in both household and commercial grinders, depending on the application. They generate a consistent grind that is equal to or better than that of any high-end or domestic espresso machine. Conical burrs are often used on gear reduction grinders that operate at very low speeds. They are used on all types of grinders, ranging from low-priced high-speed grinders to high-speed direct drive commercial grade grinders with low speeds and direct drives.

Grinders with a high speed compared. a low speed

Extremely Fast

High-speed burr grinders may still heat the coffee in the same way as blade grinders do, but they provide the user greater control over the grind size by allowing them to adjust the speed of the grinder. They also generate a grind that is rather constant. In general, "direct drive" grinders are used because the motor is connected directly to the burrs, making them to revolve at the same speed as each other.

Low Rotational Speed

Low-speed burr grinders are at the top of the list of machine types. Because this sort of grinder is known as the "Cadillac" of grinders, once you own one, you will never want to use anything else. Low-speed grinders have the benefits of producing little or no static charge, producing very little heat, operating quietly, and not bogging down or clogging up the motor when grinding extremely finely. Low-speed grinders are available with either flat burrs or conical burrs, and they may be divided into two categories: "direct drive" grinders and "gear reduction" grinders. Flat burr grinders are the most common kind of low-speed grinder.

Reduction in gears

Grinder with gear reduction has a high-speed motor that is connected to a system of gearing that slows or stops the speed of the burrs. The analogy is to the gears of a bicycle, which are moved down while cycling uphill to allow the rider's legs to go swiftly while the bicycle travels slowly upward. Despite the fact that they are louder than direct drive styles, they get the job done without causing the engine to bog down.

Direct Drive

High-end direct drive grinders are the most costly, but they are also the best grinders available for use at home or in light business applications. The low-speed motor is linked directly to the burrs, allowing them to spin at the same speed as the low-speed motor. In comparison to a lower-quality motor, these high-quality motors are built to bear the load with relative ease. Because they rotate at a low RPM, they generate very little heat or static electricity. They are also quite quiet, which is an added plus.

Dosing and non-dosing grinders are available.

When selecting a grinder, one of the most crucial decisions you will have to make is the style you want. Some grinders are what we refer to as dosing grinders, which let you to distribute the coffee by pulling a handle on the grinder. Grinding into a ground coffee container or your coffee container, such as a portafilter for an espresso machine, is the only method of dispensing coffee using a non-dosing grinder.

To begin, it is important to understand that all grinders need you to place the beans in the bean hopper before grinding them. After that, you turn on the grinder, and the beans are ground up before being routed via a chute into something else. That something is exactly what we're talking about here.

Dosing Grinders are a kind of grinder that is used to measure the amount of medication in a dose.

Dosing grinders are meant to gather the ground coffee in a container known as the ground coffee container and then dispense it straight into your receptacle, such as a portafilter, with the pull of a handle. The ground coffee container is fashioned like a pie and is divided into six portions, each of which is equally sized and formed. The ground coffee is discharged from the grinding burrs via a chute and dropped into these portions of the machine. These portions of the grinder revolve around, and when they reach the front of the grinder, the coffee is released via a hole and into your container. The rotation is controlled by a handle on the side of the vehicle (one pull turns it one sixth of a rotation). The quantity of coffee that may be accommodated by the portions is generally between 6 and 7 grams (one shot). It is possible to customize the dosage each draw with the Mazzer Mini and Pasquini Moka to anywhere between 5.5 and 9 grams.

Consider the scenario in which you want to grind just enough coffee to make a double shot. You turn on the grinder and let it to fill up one portion before pulling the lever and allowing it to fill up a subsequent section. Then you switch off the grinder and pull on the handle three times to finish it off. In order to get the portion beneath the chute to wrap around to the front, where it drops out of the bottom, three pulls will be required. On the surface, it seems like you have distributed the proper quantity of coffee. It's possible, but don't put your hopes in it. It's possible that you'll have to pull the part a few more times to retrieve all of the loose coffee that poured over the side. And if you're just grinding enough for the morning brew, you don't want to overdo it by grinding too much more.

Every espresso machine and filter basket that gets this ground coffee is a little bit different from the next one. You should get familiar with your machine and learn how much coffee works best in the filter basket that you are currently using. Fill the filter basket to the right level and then tamp it down to ensure a tight seal. If you go beyond the desired level, you may run your finger over the top of the cup and take out as much coffee as is necessary to obtain the desired level. As long as you understand how your dosage grinder works and can adjust to it, you will have a long and fruitful relationship with it. If you are able to use your eye to gauge what the right amount is while the container is filled loosely, using any dosing grinder should be rather simple.

Another thing to bear in mind is that coffee is naturally inclined to create a sloppy mess. No matter how hard you try to keep it off the counter, it has a mind of its own and will find a way to get past even the most vigilant of people's protection mechanisms. The motion of pulling the handle and the rotation of the parts will almost certainly cause a little amount of coffee to escape from your portafilter. Please don't be discouraged; just have a sponge nearby. Having learned more about what a dosing grinder is, do you believe it is right for you?

Rancilio Rocky, Gaggia MDF, Quamar M80 Timer, and Ceado E6X are just a handful of the best-known dosing espresso grinders on the market right now.

Non-Dosing Grinders are a kind of grinder that does not need the use of a dose.

Non-dosing grinders are available in a number of various designs. Some are meant to be used in conjunction with an espresso machine to grind straight into a portafilter. Grinding straight into a portafilter with a non-dosing grinder: E37J, Rocket Espresso Macinatore Fausto in black, Eureka Atom and ECM C-Manuale 54 are some of the most popular options.

Others, like as the Baratza Grinders, may grind either into its own detachable ground coffee container or straight into your portafilter, depending on your preference.

Adjustment with Steps vs. Adjustment without Steps

On our grinders, there are two distinct types of grind settings to choose from. In addition to the most common adjustment, known as the "stepped" adjustment, we now have the considerably more sophisticated "stepless adjustment."

Stepped

Stepped adjustment grinders are available in two different designs. The "Self Holding" and the "Lever Release" are the two types of levers. The reason why manufacturers create "stepped" adjustments is because they need a method of locking the setting into place once it has been made. If this is not done, the grind setting may vary when the grinder is used.

To modify the grind setting on the "Self-Holding" grinders, you will either crank the bean hopper or turn an adjustment knob. As you spin it, you will hear and feel a "click," which indicates that the setting has been locked in. With each click, you will increase or decrease the fineness setting by one level. Grinders from Gaggia, Saeco, and Capresso are among those available.

On grinders with a "Lever Release," such as the Rancilio Rocky and the Pasquini Moka, you must first press down a release lever and then turn the bean hopper to adjust the fineness. You will not hear any clicks when it spins since it is silent. The bean hopper/setting will snap into place when you let go of the release lever, which will prevent it from being accidentally moved.

Stepless

Grinders with stepless adjustment provide an almost limitless number of grind settings to choose from when fine tuning a grind. You have complete control over how much or how little you want to change the setting. Like with grinders with stepped adjustment, there are no preset points at which the grind setting will stop, unlike on this model.

Summary

Coffee grinding is a physically violent activity. The more coffee you grind, the hotter the coffee becomes as a result of increased heat generated by the grinding burrs and surrounding elements. High-speed grinders produce the greatest amount of static charge and heating up your freshly ground coffee. The size of the grind you will need is closely tied to the sort of equipment you will be using. Different varieties of espresso/coffee machines produce a fine powder that is nearly powder-like in texture.

The longer the coffee is ground, the finer the grind gets. In a coffee grinder, the burrs are the portion that smashes the coffee beans into a consistent size. There are two types of burr grinders available: Conical and Flat Plate Burr Grinders. Both kinds of grinders are renowned for their versatility and high level of performance. When selecting a grinder, one of the most crucial decisions you will have to make is the style you want.

Low-speed burr grinders are known as the "Cadillac" of grinders. Direct drive and gear reduction grinders also come into play. Dosing grinders are meant to gather the ground coffee in a container and then dispense it straight into your receptacle. The quantity of coffee that may be accommodated by the portions is generally between 6 and 7 grams (one shot). It is possible to customize the dosage each draw with the Mazzer Mini and Pasquini Moka.

Coffee is naturally inclined to create a sloppy mess. The motion of pulling the handle and the rotation of the parts will almost certainly cause a little amount of coffee to escape from your portafilter. Non-dosing grinder are a kind of grinder that does not need the use of a dose. On our grinders, there are two distinct types of grind settings to choose from. The "Self Holding" and the "Lever Release" are the two types of levers. With stepless adjustment, you have complete control over how much or how little you want to change the setting.